The 10 Most Filling Foods For Weight Loss

If you were to describe The Perfect Food, it might go something like this: healthful, delicious, bigger than a morsel and filling enough to fight hunger for hours. “Foods that promote satiety”—a feeling of lasting fullness—”do exist,” insists Dr. David Katz, founder of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. What makes some grub extra satisfying? “Fiber and protein can help,” says Barbara Rolls, author of The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet. Getting more bang for your bite matters, too: Low-energy-density foods, which yield big portions for few calories, “allow you to eat more without gaining weight,” Rolls says. Want some of that? Make room for these secret-weapon picks.

Baked potato

The potato has been unfairly demonized—it’s actually a potent hunger tamer. In a study that measured the satiating index of 38 foods, including brown rice and whole-wheat bread, people ranked boiled potatoes highest, reporting that they felt fuller and ate less two hours after consuming them. Though potatoes are often shunned because they’re considered high in carbohydrates, they shouldn’t be. Whether baked or boiled, they’re loaded with vitamins, fiber and other nutrients. Result? You get steady energy and lasting fullness after noshing on them.

Feel even fuller: Eat baked and boiled tubers skin-on to get more fiber for just 160 calories a pop.

Eggs

A study from Saint Louis University found that folks who ate eggs for breakfast consumed 330 fewer calories throughout the day than those who had a bagel. “Eggs are one of the few foods that are a complete protein, meaning they contain all nine essential amino acids that your body can’t make itself,” says Joy Dubost, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Once digested, those amino acids trigger the release of hormones in your gut that suppress appetite.”

Feel even fuller: Don’t discard the yolks—about half an egg’s protein lives in those yellow parts. Adding vegetables to a scramble boosts its volume and fiber content for few extra calories (an egg has 78, and a cup of spinach just 7).

Bean soup

“Soups have a high water content, which means they fill your stomach for very few calories,” says Rolls. Broth-based bean soups, in particular, contain a hefty dose of fiber and resistant starch—a good carb that slows the release of sugar into the bloodstream—to make that full feeling really stick. “Once in the stomach, fiber and water activate stretch receptors that signal that you aren’t hungry anymore,” Rolls says. All this for a measly 150 calories per cup.

Feel even fuller: Resist the cracker pack on the side in favor of a bigger soup helping. Beans are starchy, satisfying and caloric enough on their own, Rolls says. Hate soup? Throw lentils, black-eyed peas or kidney or navy beans into a vinegar-based salad.

Greek yogurt

Harvard researchers examined the eating habits of 120,000 people for 20 years and found that yogurt was the single best food for shedding pounds: Over time, people who downed more of the protein-packed stuff lost pounds without trying. Meanwhile, a Nestlé Nutrition Institute study review found that consuming dairy proteins increases satiety, reduces food intake and keeps blood sugar steady. “Greek yogurt, which is strained to remove liquid whey, contains double the protein and less sugar than regular yogurt,” Dubost says.

Feel even fuller: Top yogurt with fibrous foods like raspberries (4 grams of fiber per half cup) or a cereal such as Kashi Go Lean Crisp Cinnamon Crumble (9 grams per three quarters of a cup).

Apples

Apples are one of the few fruits that contain pectin, which naturally slows digestion and promotes a feeling of fullness, according to a study in Gastroenterology. In fact, people who ate an apple as part of a meal felt more satiated and ate less than those who consumed a calorically equivalent amount of juice and applesauce. “Whole apples take a long time to eat for very few calories,” says Susan Roberts, professor of nutrition at Tufts University. Your body has more time to tell your brain that you’re no longer hungry. That means you can eat lots of this low-energy-density, high-satiety fruit and avoid feeling deprived while losing weight, adds Roberts.

Feel even fuller: Add apple chunks to oatmeal or salad, or slices to a turkey-on-whole-wheat sandwich.

Popcorn

This movie-night fave is a low-energy-density food—for 90 calories, you could eat 3 cups of air-popped corn but just a quarter cup of potato chips. “Popcorn takes up more room in your stomach, and seeing a big bowl of it in front of you tricks you into thinking that you’re eating more calories and that you’ll feel full when you’re finished,” Rolls says.

Feel even fuller: Sprinkle on some red pepper. In a recent Purdue University study, people who added a half teaspoon of the spice to a meal felt less hungry.

Figs

A great natural cure for a sweet tooth, fresh figs have a dense consistency and sweet flesh that’s high in fiber (each 37-calorie fig packs about a gram), which slows the release of sugar into the blood, preventing the erratic high caused by cookies or cake.

Feel even fuller: Halve and add protein, like a teaspoon of goat cheese and a walnut.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal’s filling force comes from its high fiber content and its uncanny ability to soak up liquid like a sponge. When cooked with water or skim milk, the oats thicken and take more time to pass through your digestive system, meaning you’ll go longer between hunger pangs.

Feel even fuller: Sprinkle almonds on top of your bowl. “The nuts pack protein and fiber and contain unsaturated fats that can help stabilize insulin levels,” regulating blood sugar, Katz says.

Wheat berries

Move over, quinoa. Wheat berries, which are whole-wheat kernels, contain one of the highest amounts of protein and fiberß per serving of any grain—6 grams of protein and 6 grams of fiber. “Protein triggers the hormone ghrelin to tell our brain that we are satisfied,” Roberts explains, “and fiber activates appetite-suppressing gut hormones.”

Feel even fuller: Do what celeb chef Ellie Krieger, does: Toss wheat berries with apples, nuts and other diet-friendly foods to make a super tasty salad (that’s her recipe at right).

Smoothies

While most beverages don’t satisfy hunger very well, drinks blended full of air are an exception: They cause people to feel satiated and eat less at their next meal, according to a Penn State University study. Just be sure you’re not whipping your smoothie full of sugary, caloric ingredients like fruit juices or flavored syrups, which will negate the health benefits.

Feel even fuller: Put ice and fat-free milk or yogurt in a blender, add in fruit and give it a whirl. Try strawberries, which are extremely low in energy density—they’re 92 percent water!—and bananas, which are loaded with resistant starch.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

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Tea Addiction Results In Teeth Loss

Decades of hard tea drinking led to tooth loss and other bone problems for a 47-year-old Michigan woman, reports the New England Journal of Medicine. After treating the patient for severe pain in her back, arms, legs and hips, her doctor Sudhaker Rao discovered that consuming “astronomical amounts” of highly concentrated tea for nearly 20 years had caused her fluoride levels to spike to more than four times the normal amount.

As a result, her bones had become so brittle that her teeth had to be extracted. “Her bone density was very high, seven times denser than normal,” says Rao, “it was like steel.” In the US, brewed tea contains hight amounts of fluoride, which Rao believes was causing her bone problems. “There have been about three to four cases reported in the US associated with ingesting tea, especially large amounts of it,” he notes. The patient had been downing a pitcher of tea–containing roughly 20 milligrams of fluoride–a day. “Most of us can excrete fluoride extremely well, but if you drink too much, it can be a problem,” he says.

The patient has been prescribed a tea-free diet, and has since recovered. Experts say her case serves as proof that extreme consumption of almost any substance can be harmful. New York City doctor Joseph Lane, chief of the metabolic bone disease service at Weill Cornell Medical College, says he once had a patient who “overdosed” on fish oil. “Then she had a minor injury and bled a lot, almost like hemophilia,” he explains, “it turns out the patient had too much vitamin E in the blood.”

Child Born With HIV Is ‘Functionally Cured’

For the first time, doctors are reporting that a child born with HIV and put on an unusually aggressive treatment regimen has been functionally cured of the infection.

Now 2 years old, the Mississippi girl has only trace amounts of HIV in her bloodstream and has been able to keep the virus that causes AIDS in check without the help of medication, doctors said Sunday at a medical conference in Atlanta.

If researchers demonstrate that the same treatment can work in other children, it could drastically alter the lives of the estimated 1,000 babies born with HIV every day, most of them in Africa, doctors said.

“If there is a trial that shows this can happen again, then this will be very important,” said Dr. Karin Nielsen, a pediatrician who specializes in infectious diseases at UCLA‘s David Geffen School of Medicine who was not involved in the girl’s case. “You’ll be able to treat people very intensively and reverse the disease.”

Attempting to replicate the results in other HIV-positive infants is “our next step,” said Dr. Deborah Persaud, a virologist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center who described the Mississippi patient at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. She and others are to make a formal presentation during the conference’s scientific program Monday.

Details of the unusual case have not yet been published in a medical journal so that other doctors and researchers can assess it. It’s possible that the girl — although at high risk for contracting the virus from her mother — was not actually infected herself, skeptics said.

Researchers who have examined her case extensively say they believe she did have the virus but was able to knock it back before it had time to establish itself in parts of the immune system where it can remain dormant and strike again after drug treatments are stopped. Such viral reservoirs are essentially impossible to treat once they have been established.

“Is it possible the child was not infected? Yes. Is it likely? No,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases. The virus probably could not have remained in the baby’s body as long as it had if she had not been infected, he said.

In the United States and other developed countries, more than 98% of babies born to mothers with HIV do not get the virus thanks to preventive treatments that begin before birth and last up to six weeks afterward. In this case, the girl’s mother did not know she had HIV until she took a screening test after she was already in labor, said Dr. Hannah Gay, the pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson who treated the baby.

Instead of giving the newborn just one antiretroviral drug, Gay opted for a three-drug regimen that is sometimes given as a long-term treatment for infected babies, she said. The first infusion was begun when the girl was only 30 hours old — several days before blood tests confirmed she was HIV-positive at birth, Gay said.

With continued treatment, it took less than a month for the girl’s viral load to become undetectable with standard clinical tests, Gay said.

The treatments continued normally for about 15 months, then became sporadic. When the girl was 18 months old, her mother stopped bringing her to the doctor and she didn’t receive her medications.

Five months later, the girl returned to the clinic and had her blood drawn. Gay said she expected to find that her viral load was high. Instead, her HIV levels were still undetectable. Additional tests a few days later confirmed the results, Gay said.

That’s when Persaud and Dr. Katherine Luzuriaga, an immunologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, began studying the girl’s blood. Using the most sensitive tests available, they were able to find tiny amounts of HIV “particles” but no virus capable of replicating, the research team reported.

The analysis was funded by the National Institutes of Health and amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research.

Among adults with HIV, a lucky few — less than 1 in 200 — are able to keep the virus at bay without the help of medications. But this girl is not one of these “elite controllers,” Fauci said, because in her case doctors could not detect the presence of any virus capable of replication at all.

“You can always isolate virus from elite controllers,” he said. “It’s just that they control it so well, it doesn’t replicate.”

The case of the Mississippi patient is unusual because doctors would not stop a patient’s treatment intentionally to see how he or she would fare without antiretroviral drugs. It is also unusual, Fauci said, because most pregnant women in the U.S. who are HIV-positive receive prenatal treatment to fight the virus, which dramatically decreases the risk of transferring the infection to the baby.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that fewer than 200 babies in the nation were infected with HIV at birth in 2010.

But in developing regions — including sub-Saharan Africa, the site of two-thirds of the world’s HIV infections — it’s a different story. Every year, 300,000 to 400,000 babies are born infected with HIV, Fauci said.

More than half of those children die within the first year, said UCLA’s Nielsen, who conducts research on HIV infection in infants and children. If the triple-drug treatment is proved in clinical trials, the therapy could be a boon for these babies.

Fauci suggested that in addition to such trials, researchers might want to take another look at children who have been on antiretroviral therapies since shortly after birth to see whether any of them had the disease cleared from their bodies.

“You don’t want to recommend stopping therapy, but you do want to go back and look very carefully,” he said. “It may be that we cured them and we don’t realize it.”

The Mississippi girl is the second patient in the world known to be functionally cured of HIV. The first was Timothy Brown — better known as the Berlin patient — who had not only HIV but also acute myeloid leukemia. When oncologists gave him a bone marrow transplant in 2007, they selected a donor who had a rare genetic mutation that blocks the HIV virus from entering cells. As a result, Brown is now immune to the virus and remains HIV-free without taking any medication.

Why Your Office Coffee Mug Should Be Cleaned At Home

Everyone has that one mug at work that they use for just about every beverage. And even though you love it, the truth is, rarely does it get taken home for a good wash. Many times we’re scrubbing it at the office with sponges and brushes that have been used by everyone — hello, bacteria. In fact, Charles Gerba, Ph.D., a professor of environmental microbiology at the University of Arizonatold Mens Health that twenty percent of mugs carry fecal bacteria. “Colonies of germs are living in your favorite cup,” he told the magazine. That’s why cleaning your office cup is super important. Luckily, there are a few ways to go about this.

Gerba says to bring it home daily to be washed in a dishwasher on the hottest temperature possible. But if you don’t have a dishwasher, one user on Mamapedia said to first fill the cup with hot water and put a teaspoon of baking soda in it, letting it sit overnight. And then, finally wash it in hot water as you normally would.

While it might be a pain to bring this cup back and forth with you everyday, it’s totally worth it, considering what’s lurking inside, and we’d rather be a little inconvenienced than have to deal with getting sick from our daily cup of joy.

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How to Avoid Throwing up while Drinking

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It’s no fun, and if you’ve never been there, you don’t want to go. The smell is awful, no matter where you turn the floor is there to greet you and the person who has to hold your hair will never – never – let you forget it. And, that’s if someone is even willing to hold your hair (or your tie, or your dignity).

  1. Drink water. If you’re very prone to vomiting you might want to alternate an alcoholic beverage and a glass of water during the entire night. Otherwise, once you get very drunk and perhaps a little nauseous switch entirely to water. Drink water regularly throughout the day; never chug water before drinking. Why? Because water counterbalances the toxicity of alcohol on your body by diluting it in your bloodstream and accelerating its breakdown. In other words, water washes alcohol away.
  2. Know your limit. This often is a matter of trial and error, however make sure you learn from the errors.
  3. Drink slowly. Our nervous system usually takes time to deliver to our brain centers the message that we are drunk, because of the time that alcohol takes to reach those centers. That’s why when you drink fast, your blood may be filled with toxins while your brain (or you) are still not aware of it. Chill, dance, have a chat, take a sip, don’t rush it.
  4. Stop drinking when you’ve reached your limit. This is harder than it sounds, especially when friends are encouraging you to have another and your inhibitions are lowered by the amount you’ve already had. A good defense is “if I have another I’ll vomit”, especially if you’re talking to the person that lives there.
  5. Eat something. If you’re getting too drunk too quick, eating something will slow that down. And if you know beforehand that you’re going to a place where food is out of reach, make sure you eat before you go. But not too much (a whole pizza), and not too little (an apple). Something with bread will do the job.
  6. Get some fresh air. Cooling off is a big part of this, parties tend to get hot, and cool air can do wonders to make you feel better. As an added bonus, if you do vomit it won’t be while you’re surrounded by people.
  7. Stop drinking. If you get close to vomiting, you’re done for the night. Especially if you do vomit (even if you feel much better), drinking more will lead to more vomiting and potentially alcohol poisoning.

Seven reasons Why You Should Turn Your TV Off

We love Downton Abbey as much as the next red-blooded television owner, but recent news has made us a bit squeamish about plopping down in front of the tube. Sure, there are some benefits to TV viewing: for example, a pair of studies published last September found that watching a rerun of a favorite show could help people muster up willpower and emotional energy.

But on balance, the news isn’t good: TV viewing a la American — meaning 2.5 to three hours per day, according to the latest numbers — increases risk for diabetes, heart disease, obesity, attention problems and weight gain in children and, well, death.

And just this week, we learned more sobering news: Watching 20 hours of television per week was associated with a 44 percent reduction in sperm. That got us thinking about all the ways that television viewing can contribute to other health concerns — here are seven reasons to power down and get off the couch:

1-Improve Fertility: A Harvard study released on Feb. 4 in BMJ found that men who watch 20 or more hours of television (within the national average for men, per the 2011 American Time Use Survey) had a 44 percent reduction in sperm. But not to worry: turning off the tube and getting active could help. In the course of the same study, researchers found that men who work out at least 15 hours per week have 73 percent higher sperm counts.

2-Enjoy A Happier Marriage: Love the soaps? It could affect your marriage.
The more you believe in the romantic relationships you see on TV, the less likely you are to be happy with your own, according to a 2012 study in the journal Mass Communication and Society.

3- Live Longer: Power down, cheat death? Watching TV doesn’t just affect your overall health in the short term — it can actually have an impact on how long you live. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that for every additional three hours of daily television watched, the risk of dying of any cause increased by an average 13 percent.

4- Sleep Better: Shutting off the TV should happen well before bedtime. In a study of more than 20,000 American adults, researchers found that nearly 50 percent watched TV within the two hours before bed. And, as we know, TV before bed can reduce our overall hours of sleep which can, in turn, contribute to increased risk of everything from depression to cancer.

5- Maintain Healthy Weight In Children: Limiting TV time is an effective way to help children lose weight, according to a 2012 study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

6- Have A Better Heart: In the same JAMA study that found an association between TV watching and death, researchers discovered that TV hours could also have a damaging effect on heart health: for every two additional hours a person was glued to the screen, their risk of heart disease increased by 15 percent. Meanwhile risk of diabetes increased by 25 percent for the same time period.

7- Help Kids Keep Healthy Diets: A 2012 study in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that children who watched TV after school were more likely to consume candy and sugary drinks on a daily basis and less likely to eat fruits and veggies.