‘Romanian Orthodox Priests’ Produce Steamy Gay 2013 Calendar (PHOTOS)

A calendar spread featuring men who claim to be Romanian Orthodox priests in scintillating poses is making the blogosphere rounds.

The Romanian Orthodox calendar includes “12 seductive artistic pictures of Orthodox priests and their guests” according to its official website. The calendar’s description reads as follows:

“It is a time when the Orthodox Church is embroiled in corruption scandals, artist repression, gay sex cover-ups, outrageous behavior and homophobia. Yet some of their members have agreed to strike a pose and openly stand for who they are underneath the priest’s clothing they wear: regular people with passions, preferences, interests and desires.”

Preview photos which appear on the calendar’s Facebook page contain some double entendre-laden captions. Reads one: “Father Daniel has a simple plan to collect enough funds from his church to help needy children in his village. But the size of some men’s projects have made his jaw drop.”

Describing the calendar as “homoerotic” with shots “mingling the edgy with the hot,” officials go on to note: “This first 2013 edition tells the individual story of 12 intensely masculine young men and their guests representing different parts of Eastern Europe. All are open-minded and believe that besides their passionate devotion to the Orthodox Church, it is important to be perceived as individuals committed to diversity and acceptance.”

Read more about the calendar here.

“Father Daniel has a simple plan to collect enough funds from his church to help needy children in his village. But the size of some men’s projects have made his jaw drop.”

 

“Besides God, Father Lazarus has a small passion: painting! He will paint anything he considers beautiful, even if it steamy”

 

“Brotherly love has never been stronger. Jacob and Esau have been together their entire lives and always take care of one another.”

 

‘Alien’ Skulls Found At Sonora, Mexico, Ancient Burial Site

An ancient burial site in Mexico, discovered in 1999 but only recently investigated, has revealed skeletal remains with odd, “alien-shaped” skulls.

They were unearthed in the northwestern Mexican state of Sonora at a site known as “El Cementerio” when workers stumbled upon the remains accidentally while digging to install an irrigation system. According to Time, the bones date to between A.D. 940 and 1308, making them around 1,000 years old.

 

The skulls appear to have been intentionally deformed until they resembled something akin to the “Coneheads,” the fictional alien family made famous on “Saturday Night Live” in the late 1970s.

 

“This was an Hispanic cemetery with 25 skulls, and 13 of them have deformed heads,” Cristina Garcia Moreno, a researcher from Arizona State University who worked on the project, told ABC News. “We don’t know why this population specifically deformed their heads.”

 

Although skull deformation was a documented ritual among many indigenous groups in southern Central and South America, LiveScience reports this is the first discovery of the practice so far north. “The most important implication would be to extend the northern boundary of the Mesoamerican influence,” Moreno explained to LiveScience.

 

In an earlier interview, Ryan Matthew, a host on the Science Channel, explained that the process of cranial deformation usually began in childhood.

 

“When you were a newborn baby, you would be cradle-boarded,” Matthew said. “They would put two boards around the head and wrap it very securely. Because the head of a child is very soft, it can be manipulated forward, but the process would take several months.”

 

Florida’s Long Lines On Election Day Discouraged 49,000 People From Voting

Florida took center stage in the 2012 elections, when voters around the state had to wait in line at the polls for up to nine hours. Gov. Rick Scott (R) initially denied that there was any problem, saying it was “very good” that people were getting out to vote.

But a new study shows that tens of thousands of people were actually discouraged from voting because of the long lines.

According to an analysis by Theodore Allen, an associate professor of industrial engineering at Ohio State University, as many as 49,000 individuals in Central Florida did not vote because of the problems at the polls.

About 19,000 of those people would have backed former GOP nominee Mitt Romney, while the rest would have gone for President Barack Obama, according to Allen.

The Orlando Sentinel, which published the results of Allen’s research, notes that those findings suggest “that Obama’s margin over Romney in Florida could have been roughly 11,000 votes higher than it was, based just on Central Florida results. Obama carried the state by 74,309 votes out of more than 8.4 million cast.”

Since the elections, Scott has admitted that his state still has its share of electoral problems. In a December interview with CNN, Scott said “we’ve got to restore confidence in our elections,” pointing to three issues: the length of ballots, size of polling places and the number of days for early voting.

Indeed, Allen’s research also found that the long ballots that confronted many Florida voters led to longer lines, which resulted in suppressing turnout. Black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately disenfranchised.

The GOP-controlled legislature reduced the number of days available for early voting from 14 to eight for the 2012 elections, meaning voters were trying to cast their ballots in a shorter window, which resulted in longer lines.

Scott refused to extend early voting hours even as problems at the polls gained more attention. Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, who was a Republican while in office but is now a Democrat,- called his position “indefensible.”

Democratic state lawmakers in Florida have introduced legislation to address the long lines and expand early voting hours. There have also been several efforts at the federal level, and Obama has said it is imperative to “fix” problems at the polls.

Predicting Who Will Become A Mass Shooter Is Difficult, Say Psychiatrists, Criminologists

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CHICAGO — It happened after Columbine, Virginia Tech, Aurora, Colo., and now Sandy Hook: People figure there surely were signs of impending violence. But experts say predicting who will be the next mass shooter is virtually impossible – partly because as commonplace as these calamities seem, they are relatively rare crimes.

Still, a combination of risk factors in troubled kids or adults including drug use and easy access to guns can increase the likelihood of violence, experts say.

But warning signs “only become crystal clear in the aftermath, said James Alan Fox, a Northeastern University criminology professor who has studied and written about mass killings.

“They’re yellow flags. They only become red flags once the blood is spilled,” he said.

Whether 20-year-old Adam Lanza, who used his mother’s guns to kill her and then 20 children and six adults at their Connecticut school, made any hints about his plans isn’t publicly known.

Fox said that sometimes, in the days, weeks or months preceding their crimes, mass murderers voice threats, or hints, either verbally or in writing, things like `”don’t come to school tomorrow,”` or `”they’re going to be sorry for mistreating me.”` Some prepare by target practicing, and plan their clothing “as well as their arsenal.” (Police said Lanza went to shooting ranges with his mother in the past but not in the last six months.)

Although words might indicate a grudge, they don’t necessarily mean violence will follow. And, of course, most who threaten never act, Fox said.

Even so, experts say threats of violence from troubled teens and young adults should be taken seriously and parents should attempt to get them a mental health evaluation and treatment if needed.

“In general, the police are unlikely to be able to do anything unless and until a crime has been committed,” said Dr. Paul Appelbaum, a Columbia University professor of psychiatry, medicine and law. “Calling the police to confront a troubled teen has often led to tragedy.”

The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry says violent behavior should not be dismissed as “just a phase they’re going through.”

In a guidelines for families, the academy lists several risk factors for violence, including:

_Previous violent or aggressive behavior

_Being a victim of physical or sexual abuse

_Guns in the home

_Use of drugs or alcohol

_Brain damage from a head injury

Those with several of these risk factors should be evaluated by a mental health expert if they also show certain behaviors, including intense anger, frequent temper outbursts, extreme irritability or impulsiveness, the academy says. They may be more likely than others to become violent, although that doesn’t mean they’re at risk for the kind of violence that happened in Newtown, Conn.

Lanza, the Connecticut shooter, was socially withdrawn and awkward, and has been said to have had Asperger’s disorder, a mild form of autism that has no clear connection with violence.

Autism experts and advocacy groups have complained that Asperger’s is being unfairly blamed for the shootings, and say people with the disorder are much more likely to be victims of bullying and violence by others.

According to a research review published this year in Annals of General Psychiatry, most people with Asperger’s who commit violent crimes have serious, often undiagnosed mental problems. That includes bipolar disorder, depression and personality disorders. It’s not publicly known if Lanza had any of these, which in severe cases can include delusions and other psychotic symptoms.

Young adulthood is when psychotic illnesses typically emerge, and Appelbaum said there are several signs that a troubled teen or young adult might be heading in that direction: isolating themselves from friends and peers, spending long periods alone in their rooms, plummeting grades if they’re still in school and expressing disturbing thoughts or fears that others are trying to hurt them.

Appelbaum said the most agonizing calls he gets are from parents whose children are descending into severe mental illness but who deny they are sick and refuse to go for treatment.

And in the case of adults, forcing them into treatment is difficult and dependent on laws that vary by state.

All states have laws that allow some form of court-ordered treatment, typically in a hospital for people considered a danger to themselves or others. Connecticut is among a handful with no option for court-ordered treatment in a less restrictive community setting, said Kristina Ragosta, an attorney with the Treatment Advocacy Center, a national group that advocates better access to mental health treatment.

Lanza’s medical records haven’t been publicly disclosed and authorities haven’t said if it is known what type of treatment his family may have sought for him. Lanza killed himself at the school.

Jennifer Hoff of Mission Viejo, Calif. has a 19-year-old bipolar son who has had hallucinations, delusions and violent behavior for years. When he was younger and threatened to harm himself, she’d call 911 and leave the door unlocked for paramedics, who’d take him to a hospital for inpatient mental care.

Now that he’s an adult, she said he has refused medication, left home, and authorities have indicated he can’t be forced into treatment unless he harms himself – or commits a violent crime and is imprisoned. Hoff thinks prison is where he’s headed – he’s in jail, charged in an unarmed bank robbery.

Facebook’s Poke App For iPhone

Facebook’s Poke app has taken the App Store by storm, and in less than a day, already sits aloft the iTunes Free app chart. The app, which, in essence, is a chat app with a few twists, only just released for iPhone, but already, has become the most popular free on the App Store.

Google made similar waves when it released its Maps app for iOS, but while Google Maps was deemed by many as a necessity thanks to the shortcomings of Apple’s stock Maps app, the success of Facebook Poke is perhaps a little more of a surprise.

Then again, maybe it shouldn’t be all that surprising. After all, Facebook really seems to have got it together with regards to creating solid, clean apps, and where many users would berate and pour scorn over Facebook for iOS with every new release, it now offers a great service to those looking to network on-the-fly.

Facebook seems keen to dissect its services into separate entities, and having already brought the likes of Facebook Messenger and more recently, Facebook Camera to the fold, the arrival of Facebook Poke seems – if anything – an inevitability.

As well as the contact side, lots of people are – or will soon be – firing up brand-new iOS devices, and instinctively looking for content to fill up the home screen by checking the top apps sections. I’d suggest the vast majority of Facebook users will download the Poke app out of pure intrigue, and having used it myself earlier today, I was very impressed by its seamless nature.

With a billion users, it’s easy to see why Facebook’s latest export has gathered so much traction. Whether it withstand the test of time and remain there in one, two or three weeks’ time remains to be seen.

Sunny Sleevez

cup of tea

The secret to warming up, getting your antioxidants and reviving dry winter skin can be as easy as putting the kettle on.  This low cost, delicious  miracle in a mug is of course tea!

Being English my kettle rarely get a chance to cool between brews. It’s great to know that 2 of my favorite beverages also promote a variety of health benefits.

  • Green tea is made from leaves which are not fermented and therefore, have the highest level of polyphenols (also known as flavonoids), which are chemical compounds that act as a defense mechanism against harmful environmental conditions. They can help to clear cell damage on the skin, reduce inflammation,  protect against free radicals and keep your skin looking smooth and youthful. For extra beautification apply green tea directly to the skin.
  • Black tea is made from the same leaves as green tea. It contains ten times more antioxidants…

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